The Nishika N8000 lenticular 3-D camera. I recently was given this camera by my grandfather and is the latest addition to my collection. We set this up in the studio at work and it started to look like some futuristic spaceship (from the 80’s, like something out of THX1138). We used two monoblocks with softboxes, one directly above and one off to the left. For some reason I got a weird lense flair near the bottom right of my images (kinda ghostly). The camera uses standard 35mm film and uses 4 lenses to produce a 3D image. I have added two videos with Vincent Price explaining the N8000- way too cool and old.

Check out the Nishika flickr group for recent images taken with the N8000 camera.

3dstereo.com has a couple for sale if you are interesrted. $25 and they have a pretty good product description: Long considered the ugly duckling of the consumer lenticular cameras, the Nishika is now in high regard as the most versatile of the breed, because the camera features three aperature settings, unlike other lenticular cameras, which are only point and shoot cameras… The Nishika N8000 stereo lenticular camera uses standard 35mm color print film.  When viewing lenticular prints, no special glasses or viewers are needed. The camera takes four photos simultaneously from four slightly different angles using a 30mm Quadra Lens System of four identical lenses that are precisely aligned. The lenses have a fixed focal length and have such great depth-of-field that they are focus free.

www.snap3d.com can print 3D but they have to send it to Canada.

Want a more in depth look at how the Nishika 3D system works? Read this highly informative article.

Nimslo and Nishika Where are they now?

[wow, this is the most info I have put into a post yet and you haven’t even got to see the photos yet. Well stop reading and look below.]

© 2010 Brent Barnett

© 2010 Brent Barnett

© 2010 Brent Barnett

© 2010 Brent Barnett

© 2010 Brent Barnett

© 2010 Brent Barnett